145145 Division Street South

The Royal Canadian Legion, Kingsville Branch 188 was established in 1930. Prior to the “Post” being formed, local War Veterans gathered in their club above Sivern’s Shoe Shop on Main Street West. Needing a larger meeting space, the Legion purchased a unit of the Union Block in the 1940s and remained there until this building was opened in 1968. Attending the dedication ceremony was Lt. Col. Fredrick Kent Jasperson, who “led the Essex Scottish Regiment on a raid on Dieppe, August 19, 1942, where heavy casualties were suffered and he was taken as a prisoner of war at a German Camp at Eichstadt until June of 1945.”

War Veteran’s Association Formed in Kingsville

On Monday last at the call of Major George C. King, the local war veterans met in Mr. Siverns’ hall and enthusiastically agreed to form themselves into an association for the furtherance of their mutual comradeship.

The Kingsville Reporter, November 19, 1925 p.1

Branch of Legion Formed at Kingsville

A successful organization meeting was held in the Kingsville War Veterans’ club rooms last Thursday evening by local veterans to establish a post of the Canadian Legion. There were approximately 70 ex-soldiers present, including members of the Sandwich, Walkerville, Prince Edward and Leamington Posts.

Zone Representative J. Linegar, who is also president of the Walkerville Post, occupied the chair. A motion was sponsored by Capt. Austin B. Smith, M.L.A., to form a Post at Kingsville, and this was carried unanimously.

The following officers have been elected: Honorary presidents, Major G.C. King, Capt. A.B. Smith, M.L.A.; chaplain, Capt. Rev. S.P. Irwin; president, J.P. Golden; first-vice president, Edward Lucas; second vice-president, J.C. Cook; treasurer, William Linsley; secretary, C.R. McCallum. The executive consists of David Clark, Fred Gooden and Alfred White.

The Kingsville Reporter, November 27, 1930 p.5

CENOTAPH

A large crowd of people assembled on Sunday last, at 2:30, at the Church of the Epiphany, to witness the unveiling of the cenotaph – a memorial to the soldiers from this town and vicinity who laid down their lives in the Great War, while fighting in defence of a righteous cause. Upward of 2,000 persons were in attendance, and although a light rain came, it was of short duration.

The Kingsville Reporter, June 6, 1935 p.1

Canadian Legion Building Dedicated

The official dedication of the Lt. Col. F. K. Jasperson (Ont. 188) Royal Canadian Legion Hall took place on Saturday afternoon, Nov. 23rd.

A ceremonial parade of color parties, pipe bands and Legionnaires from Forest, Branch 176; Wheatley, Leamington, Essex Amherstburg and Kingsville led by Parade Marshall B. A. R. Traynor marched from the old Legion Hall to the new building.

[. . .] Julius Stomp Sr. was emphatic that it was with great pleasure to welcome everyone and thank them for their respect shown to Branch 188 on this day. During the dedication those who lost their lives through conflicts and those who were not present were remembered. The dream of a new building created interest which has constantly increased, he said. The new building is to serve the community and since the community is comparatively small a tremendous amount of work and effort was required for the final accomplishment.

The Kingsville Reporter, November 28, 1968 p.1

Car Accident Claims Life of Colonel Fred Jasperson

Lieutenant Colonel Fredrick Kent Jasperson, Q.C., D.S.O., was killed in an automobile accident on Monday, May 18, 1982. Mr. Jasperson was travelling south on Howard Avenue in Malden Township when he was in collision with a westbound truck on Pike Road. The accident occurred at 3:07 p.m. [. . .]

Colonel Jasperson was born in Kingsville and received his public school education here in town, and his high schooling in Leamington. He received his Bachelors Degree in Political Science from the University of Toronto in 1925 and graduated second in his class in law at Osgoode Hall, Toronto. The John Beverly Robinson Scholarship was awarded to him at this time. He law practice began in Windsor that same year.

Mr. Jasperson joined the 21st Essex Fusiliers (a militia unit) and later gained a major’s rank before the war in the Essex Scottish Regiment. In 1942, he became Lieutenant Colonel and had command of the regiment during World War II.

He led the Essex Scottish Regiment on a raid on Dieppe, August 19, 1942, where heavy casualties were sufferec and he was taken as a prisoner of war at a German camp at Eichstadt until June of 1945.

While a prisoner of war, he aided interested men to study law from books that were received from Osgoode Hall, sent by the Red Cross.

Upon his return, he farmed in Kingsville for a short time, and wrote short stories, some of which were published in Maclean’s Magazine.

In 1946, he appeared before the Privy Council. He was a member of the parole board for two years covering provincial institutions in Toronto, Sudbury, Guelph, etc.

In 1946, he received the Distinguished Service Order from King George VI.

Upon recieving the Distinguished Service Order, the following is the citation received:

“Lt.-Col. Jasperson was in command of the Essex Scottish Regiment in the Dieppe assault on August 19, 1942, and landed with the first wave of troops on the main beach. The landing craft successfully touched down and the attack in waves was pushed forward across the beach through heavy barbed wire obstacles until they reached the sea wall. Immediately in front of the sea wall stretched a broad esplanade which was protected by a series of barbed wire entanglements and the esplanade beyond were under continual heavy enemy fire of all calibres. A number of attempts were made by parties of the unit to cross the esplanade or work around the western end. One party successfully entered the town.

Lt.-Col. Jasperson made repeated efforts to push forward and secure the original objective. Despite every effort, little progress was made and eventually the beach on which he landed was overrun and Lt.-Col. Jasperson with many of his officers and men was captured. This officer displayed complete disregard for his own safety, continuously exposing himself to enemy fire in his endeavour to get his unit forward. The spirit shown by this officer in the face of impossible odds was an inspiration to all ranks of the Essex Scottish Regiment.”

The Kingsville Reporter, May 19, 1982 p.1

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