Tag Archives: Smith

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James & Mabel Coate House (1900)

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Categories: 1900s, Tags: , , , , ,

68 Division Street South

A two-storey frame house was built in 1881 by James Workman King, just north of the brick house he was planning to build (86 Division Street South). The home was quite modest and was used to house his “hired men,” and later became a rental property. In the fall of 1899, J.W.’s daughter Mabel became engaged to James R. Coate, a local hardware merchant. Mabel was given the frame house on Division St. S. in anticipation of the wedding the following spring. Her fiancé purchased a house from John D. Wigle, who was preparing to build his own brick residence, moved it to Mabel’s lot and attached it to the original home. When completed in 1900, the home was described as “one of the nicest and most convenient in town. The wood used in the interior is ash finished in oil, giving a very pretty effect. It is electric lighted throughout and piped for hot and cold water. The woodwork on the structure was done by G.W. Mercer and reflects credit upon that gentleman’s skill and taste as a workman.”

Marriage of Mr. J.R. Coate and Miss Mabel King.

A pretty wedding in Kingsville on Wednesday was that of Miss Mabel King, daughter of Mr. James King and Mr. James [Richard] Lamont Coate.

The church, the home of the bride, and the adjoining residence of Mrs. Curtis Green, sister of the bride, where the wedding breakfast was served, were most beautifully decorated with a profusion of ferns and pink and white roses.

The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Mr. Anderson at the Church of the Epiphany.

Punctually at three o’clock the bride looking lovelier than ever in her dainty bride robe of white silk and chiffon and wearing the usual veil, entered the church leaning on the arm of her father. Then followed the two little flower girls, Muriel Green, niece of the bride, and Marjory McKay, both looking sweet in fluffy white dresses and wearing wreaths of pink rosebuds and carrying sweet peas.

The bridesmaids, Miss Gertrude King, sister of the bride, and Miss Laura King, cousin of the bride, looking very pretty in white organdie dresses trimmed with white satin ribbon and lace, and large white hats trimmed with pink Meline and carrying pink roses.

The best man was Mr. Wesley Petch of Detroit and the ushers were Mr. Fred Allworth, Mr. Abram Green, Mr. George King and Mr. Charles King.

A reception was held at the bride’s home to seventy friends.

Mr. and Mrs. Coate left on the evening train for Chicago and other western points.

The popularity of the bride was shown by the great number of costly and magnificent wedding presents.

The flower decorations at the church were placed under the direction of Mrs. Dr. White, and were remarked upon by those present as the finest they had ever seen at a similar function. Mrs. White’s well known taste in such matters was amply displayed in the beautiful arrangement of roses and other potted plants around the chancel in the windows, around the chandeliers and twined about the doors, while the collection of ferns was probably the largest ever seen in Kingsville.

Miss Dollie Forster presided at the organ and played the wedding march.

The Kingsville Reporter, June 21, 1900 p.4

T.J. Salmoni has purchased the J.R. Coate residence on Division street south and will move into it on Oct. 1.

Amherstburg Echo, September 18, 1903 p.6

Ex-Mayor Salmoni Sells His Residence

W.A. Smith bought Salmoni’s house west side Division street south. Salmoni will built east side Division. Smith sold his house on the corner opposite the park to W.A. Russell of Guelph.

The Kingsville Reporter, June 12, 1919 p.1

The residence of W.A. Smith which he recently purchased from T.J. Salmoni has been re-rooted, partially resided and a fine verandah built on the east end and south side and the whole repainted, making it one of the finest appearing residences on the street.

The Kingsville Reporter, August 14, 1919 p.5

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John Malott House (1887)

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Categories: 1880s, Tags: , , ,

189 Division Street South

Designated in 2006

In the spring of 1888, John Malott (son of “wharfinger” Capt. William J. Malott) decided to stop farming and go into “the pound fishing business.” With his wife Nora (Black) and infant daughter Ada, John moved from Pearl Street West to this home built for Robert Fleming in 1887. Robert moved to John’s house to be closer to his carriage business, and John moved closer to his pound nets in Lake Erie. By 1895, John had a second daughter (Christina) and changed occupations again, advertising as “John Malott, Baker & Confectioner.” Three years later, John sold his home and moved his family to Detroit where he became a carpenter and house builder. The next owner was William A. Smith, a local businessman and lawyer, who eventually became Town Clerk, Mayor of Kingsville (1910 to 1911), Reeve of Gosfield North (1913) and County Magistrate. Smith and his wife Evelyn had two sons: Austin, lawyer and M.P.P. for Essex South (1929-1934) and Lyndon, Rhodes Scholar and Anglican Minister in Toronto.

Other owners of this home include Charles (Robert) Gascoyne & Amelia Gascoyne and Orville (Leroy) & Olive Laramie.

R. Fleming having purchased a lot on Division street, is having the foundation of a very tasty house erected thereon.

Amherstburg Echo, September 23, 1887 p.6

Robert Fleming took advantage of the Queen’s Birthday, to commemorate the event by moving into his new house lately bought of John Malott, on Pearl street, west.

John Malott having sold his late residence on Pearl street west, has moved into the new building on Division street which he purchased from Robt. Fleming.

Amherstburg Echo, June 8, 1888 p.6

Mayor Smith and Ex-Mayor Wigle were in Chatham this week. It was generally remarked that Ex-Mayor Wigle looked fine in his new hat.

The Kingsville Reporter, February 2, 1911 p.5

While ex-Mayor Wigle’s new hat has been so much admired and has been drawing so much of the attention of others, Webb wishes to announce that the ex-Mayor’s hat was bought at his gents’ furnishing store where all good goods are for sale at right prices. Some think if Mayor Smith would turn down his pantaloons and wear a hat just like that of ex-Mayor Wigle’s the citizens of the town would think their white haired boy had developed into a man.

The Kingsville Reporter, February 9, 1911 p.5

Important Real Estate Deals

Mr. Sam Scratch put through several real estate deals last week, the first of which was trading his Duplex Appartment (sic) in Windsor, to Leroy Laramie for Mr. Laramie’s farm on the Ninth Concession, of Gosfield North. He then sold Mr. Laramie the Robert Gascoyne home on Division street south, Kingsville. He then sold the Laramie farm to his son-in-law, Earl Ryall of Olinda.

The business was all wound up in Windsor and there were no written agreements on any of the deals – something that the legal firm had never seen before, leading them to remark, that there were still men living who regarded their word equal to their bond.

The Kingsville Reporter, September 26, 1929 p.1

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